m asam hyaluron reviews

m asam hyaluron reviews

M. Asam is a family-owned company that has created fine cosmetics and anti-aging products including M. Asam Hyaluron. M. Asam Hyaluron is an anti-aging cream that the manufacturer claims will help reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles and leaves skin feeling soft and supple

M. Asam Hyaluron Review – Does M. Asam Hyaluron Work?

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M.Asam Hyaluron contains ingredients that may improve skin dryness and wrinkles by hydrating and moisturizing the skin. M. Asam Hyaluron Reviews also indicate that consumers noticed the cream helped them achieve smooth skin.

Overview Of M. Asam Hyaluron

Have you noticed that your skin has started to look dull, sagging, and thin? As a result of aging and continued exposure to UV radiation, the collagen content in our skin begins to decrease, which leads to wrinkles and sagging skin. A lack of moisture and hydration also exacerbates the process of wrinkle formation. Thus, it is important to moisturize daily for healthy, glowing skin.

A product that promises to moisturize the skin and reduce the appearance of wrinkles is M. Asam Hyaluron. There are too many moisturizers available on the market today. For this reason, we research each product to help you decide if it is a good product to buy. We have collected information from sources like M. Asam Hyaluron Reviews to help you determine its suitability.

It's a nice, basic oil that is often used due to its great smoothing, softening and moisturizing properties. It's also particularly good at treating dry brittle nails (source).

M asam hyaluron reviews

Good old water, aka H2O. The most common skincare ingredient of all. You can usually find it right in the very first spot of the ingredient list, meaning it’s the biggest thing out of all the stuff that makes up the product.

It’s mainly a solvent for ingredients that do not like to dissolve in oils but rather in water.

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Once inside the skin, it hydrates, but not from the outside – putting pure water on the skin (hello long baths!) is drying.

One more thing: the water used in cosmetics is purified and deionized (it means that almost all of the mineral ions inside it is removed). Like this, the products can stay more stable over time.

It's a type of glycol that – according to the manufacturer – is an extremely good replacement for other glycols like propylene or butylene glycol. Its main job is to be a solvent, but it has also very good antimicrobial properties and acts as a true preservative booster. Also helps with skin hydration without stickiness or tacky feel.

Jojoba is a drought resistant evergreen shrub native to South-western North America. It's known and grown for jojoba oil, the golden yellow liquid coming from the seeds (about 50% of the weight of the seeds will be oil).

At first glance, it seems like your average emollient plant oil: it looks like an oil and it's nourishing and moisturizing to the skin but if we dig a bit deeper, it turns out that jojoba oil is really special and unique: technically – or rather chemically – it's not an oil but a wax ester (and calling it an oil is kind of sloppy).

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So what the heck is a wax ester and why is that important anyway? Well, to understand what a wax ester is, you first have to know that oils are chemically triglycerides: one glycerin + three fatty acids attached to it. The fatty acids attached to the glycerin vary and thus we have many kinds of oils, but they are all triglycerides. Mother Nature created triglycerides to be easily hydrolyzed (be broken down to a glycerin + 3 fatty acid molecules) and oxidized (the fatty acid is broken down into small parts) – this happens basically when we eat fats or oils and our body generates energy from it.

Mother Nature also created wax esters but for a totally different purpose. Chemically, a wax ester is a fatty acid + a fatty alcohol, one long molecule. Wax esters are on the outer surface of several plant leaves to give them environmental protection. 25-30% of human sebum is also wax esters to give us people environmental protection.

So being a wax ester results in a couple of unique properties: First, jojoba oil is extremely stable. Like crazy stable. Even if you heat it to 370 C (698 F) for 96 hours, it does not budge. (Many plant oils tend to go off pretty quickly). If you have some pure jojoba oil at home, you should be fine using it for years.

Second, jojoba oil is the most similar to human sebum (both being wax esters), and the two are completely miscible. Acne.org has this not fully proven theory that thanks to this, jojoba might be able to "trick" the skin into thinking it has already produced enough sebum, so it might have "skin balancing" properties for oily skin.

Third, jojoba oil moisturizes the skin through a unique dual action: on the one hand, it mixes with sebum and forms a thin, non-greasy, semi-occlusive layer; on the other hand, it absorbs into the skin through pores and hair follicles then diffuses into the intercellular spaces of the outer layer of the skin to make it soft and supple.

On balance, the point is this: in contrast to real plant oils, wax esters were designed by Mother Nature to stay on the surface and form a protective, moisturizing barrier and jojoba oil being a wax ester is uniquely excellent at doing that.

Unless you live under a rock you must have heard about shea butter. It's probably the most hyped up natural butter in skincare today. It comes from the seeds of African Shea or Karite Trees and used as a magic moisturizer and emollient.

But it's not only a simple emollient, it regenerates and soothes the skin, protects it from external factors (such as UV rays or wind) and is also rich in antioxidants (among others vitamin A, E, F, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate). If you are looking for rich emollient benefits + more, shea is hard to beat.

A synthetic emollient oil that leaves a soft non-greasy, non-sticky feel on the skin, absorbs fast and can be emulsified (mixed with water) very easily.

A clear, colorless and odorless oily liquid that works as a fast-spreading emollient with a dry skin feel.

A vegetable-based emulsifier that helps the oily and watery parts of the formula to mix nicely together. It is compatible with a bunch of cosmetic oils as well as active ingredients and its specialty is creating emulsions with super high heat and freeze stability (from -25 °C and +50 °C).

  • A natural moisturizer that’s also in our skin
  • A super common, safe, effective and cheap molecule used for more than 50 years
  • Not only a simple moisturizer but knows much more: keeps the skin lipids between our skin cells in a healthy (liquid crystal) state, protects against irritation, helps to restore barrier
  • Effective from as low as 3% with even more benefits at higher concentrations up to 20-40% (around 10% is a good usability-effectiveness sweet spot)
  • High-glycerin moisturizers are awesome for treating severely dry skin

A goodie plant oil coming from the polyphenol-rich seeds of the grape. It's a light emollient oil that makes your skin feel smooth and nice and also contains a bunch of good-for-the-skin stuff. It's a great source of antioxidant polyphenols, barrier repair fatty acid linoleic acid (about 55-77%, while oleic acid is about 12-27%) and antioxidant, skin-protectant vitamin E.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

The golden yellow oil coming from the Macadamia nut, a native Australian nut. Similar to other plant oils, it's loaded with emollient and nourishing fatty acids. It's a high oleic acid oil (50-67% oleic acid and only 0-5% linoleic acid) that makes it very emollient and ideal for dry skin types (and less ideal for acne-prone skin).

Its unique property is that it contains high amounts of a rare fatty acid called palmitoleic acid (12-25%) that give Macadamia oil a "cushiony" feel. It's also easily absorbed and makes the skin soft and supple.

The emollient plant oil that comes from almonds. Similar to other plant oils, it is loaded with skin-nourishing fatty acids (oleic acid – 55-86% and linoleic acid 7-35%) and contains several other skin goodies such as antioxidant vitamin E and vitamin B versions.

It's a nice, basic oil that is often used due to its great smoothing, softening and moisturizing properties. It's also particularly good at treating dry brittle nails (source).

A fatty alcohol (the non-drying type with a long oil loving chain of 22 carbon atoms) that is used to increase the viscosity of the formula and it also helps the oily and the watery parts to stay nicely mixed together (called emulsion stabilizing).

An extremely common multitasker ingredient that gives your skin a nice soft feel (emollient) and gives body to creams and lotions. It also helps to stabilize oil-water mixes (emulsions), though it does not function as an emulsifier in itself. Its typical use level in most cream type formulas is 2-3%.

It’s a so-called fatty alcohol, a mix of cetyl and stearyl alcohol, other two emollient fatty alcohols. Though chemically speaking, it is alcohol (as in, it has an -OH group in its molecule), its properties are totally different from the properties of low molecular weight or drying alcohols such as denat. alcohol. Fatty alcohols have a long oil-soluble (and thus emollient) tail part that makes them absolutely non-drying and non-irritating and are totally ok for the skin.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

It’s the most commonly used version of pure vitamin E in cosmetics. You can read all about the pure form here. This one is the so-called esterified version.

According to famous dermatologist, Leslie Baumann while tocopheryl acetate is more stable and has a longer shelf life, it’s also more poorly absorbed by the skin and may not have the same awesome photoprotective effects as pure Vit E.

The oil coming from the seeds of the nice, little, yellow-flowered plant called Evening Primrose. Similar to other plant oils, it's loaded with nourishing and moisturizing fatty acids. It's a very rich source of linoleic acid (66-76%), and also contains the soothing and healing superstar fatty acid, gamma-linolenic acid (aka GLA, 7-12%) (Btw, the richest known source of GLA is the borage oil, but evening primrose still counts as a very good source of it). It also contains oleic acid, but not too much around 6-15%.

Since the 1980's, EPO is a well-known food supplement and there are quite a lot of studies examining what happens if you take it orally. It seems to be helpful with a bunch of things: atopic dermatitis, dry eyes, brittle nails, sunburn and even acne.

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As for the skin, it's a great hydrating plant oil, that can also reduce inflammation and irritation. It's a superb healing agent that can truly help dry skin, not just on the surface by covering it (and not letting water to evaporate) but by initiating structural changes within the skin. If that's not enough, it also helps skin cell regeneration.

All in all, a real goodie especially for dry, easily irritated skin.

It’s the – sodium form – cousin of the famous NMF, hyaluronic acid (HA). If HA does not tell you anything we have a super detailed, geeky explanation about it here. The TL; DR version of HA is that it's a huge polymer (big molecule from repeated subunits) found in the skin that acts as a sponge helping the skin to hold onto water, being plump and elastic. HA is famous for its crazy water holding capacity as it can bind up to 1000 times its own weight in water.

As far as skincare goes, sodium hyaluronate and hyaluronic acid are pretty much the same and the two names are used interchangeably. As cosmetic chemist kindofstephen writes on reddit "sodium hyaluronate disassociates into hyaluronic acid molecule and a sodium atom in solution".

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In spite of this, if you search for "hyaluronic acid vs sodium hyaluronate" you will find on multiple places that sodium hyaluronate is smaller and can penetrate the skin better. Chemically, this is definitely not true, as the two forms are almost the same, both are polymers and the subunits can be repeated in both forms as much as you like. (We also checked Prospector for sodium hyaluronate versions actually used in cosmetic products and found that the most common molecular weight was 1.5-1.8 million Da that absolutely counts as high molecular weight).

What seems to be a true difference, though, is that the salt form is more stable, easier to formulate and cheaper so it pops up more often on the ingredient lists.

If you wanna become a real HA-and-the-skin expert you can read way more about the topic at hyaluronic acid (including penetration-questions, differences between high and low molecular weight versions and a bunch of references to scientific literature).

It is unknown if M. Asam is cruelty free. Leading international certifiers PETA and Leaping Bunny have no information concerning this company’s use of animal testing.

Asam reviews are overall quite positive, with most products receiving 4 and 5 star ratings. M. Asam Magic Finish Mousse is the most popular and well reviewed product, with around 550 reviews and an overall rating of 4.1 out of 5. Most of the M. Asam reviews for this product are overwhelmingly positive, and many reviewers have pointed out how well this product works with mature skin types, as well as how multi-purpose this product is.

Overall, we think that M. Asam skin care products are decent, but we weren’t that impressed with the formulations. Grapeseed oil is a very common skin care ingredient. It’s not unique and it may even lead to problems due to the high concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids. If you’re looking for a brand that creates anti-aging skin care products with innovative ingredients, we’d recommend Formulyst.

Consider Formulyst’s Ultimate Youth Concentrate. This formula is bioengineered from plant stem cells and contains a concentrated combination of five unique peptides that can stimulate the production of Epidermal Growth Factors (EGF). EGF is a protein naturally found in cells called fibroblasts, which are responsible for producing collagen. It is thought that EGF signals to fibroblasts to produce more collagen, which leads to cell growth, proliferation, and wound healing. As we age, our ability to produce EGF decreases, resulting in the key signs that contribute to aging skin. Applying products that increase EGF production, such as the Formulyst Ultimate Youth Concentrate, may increase skin strength and integrity.

There’s no need to compromise when it comes to finding skincare that is effective and safe. Carrot & Stick takes a tough love approach to skincare, perfectly balancing the power of plants with cutting edge science. Not only is Carrot & Stick good for your skin, it is also good for the environment as the formulas skip harmful chemicals commonly found in skin care products.

References

Of all the products from M Asam, the Vino Gold Day and Night Cream is by far one of their most well loved and best selling options available. This moisturizing and anti-aging cream was developed as part of the M Asam’s Vino Gold range, which utilizes a variety of grape-based.

M Asam is a European based company that is actually part of a larger chain of beauty, skincare and bodycare companies. This brand specializes specifically in skincare that takes inspiration for natural and botanical resources. One of the most well known and well loved ranges within M Asam is the.

If you’re been looking out for a cream that offers more long term tightening results towards minimize the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, you may want to check out the M Asam VinoLift Skin Tightening Cream. Unlike ike other tightening products on the market which offer temporary tightening results.

Due to the lack of substantial research into this area it is very likely there are other ingredients and class/groups of ingredients that could feed Fungal Acne which have not been indentified.

Aqua Intense Supreme Hyaluron Cream

Parabens are a large group of preservatives which are used to prevent bacteria growing in cosmetic formulations. There has been some healthy controversy surrounding them due to a few studies finding paraben presence in breast tumours and breast tissue. However, the majority of the scientific community have deemed these findings non-conclusive due to the limitations of these studies. There’s still a lot of support for avoiding parabens following the better safe than sorry route. If you do we completely support you! If you are concerned about the health safety of parabens, then feel free to avoid them by looking out for the Paraben-Free icon. If not, don’t worry about it – they do have had one of the longest safety records as preservatives!

Which Ingredients are classified as Paraben?

A product will be paraben-free if it does not contain any of the following parabens:

  • Sodium Isobutylparaben
  • Sodium Ethylparaben
  • Sodium Butylparaben
  • Propylparaben
  • Isopropylparaben
  • Isobutylparaben
  • Sodium Propylparaben
  • Butylparaben
  • Ethylparaben
  • Sodium Methylparaben
  • Methylparaben
Sulfate-Free

M. Asam Aqua Intense Supreme Hyaluron Cream is free from SkinCarisma flagged Sulfates

Understanding Sulfates

Sulfates are a large group of ingredients which act as cleansing agents in Cosmetics. They help loosen up the dirt and grime from your skin and hair to allow for water to wash it away with ease. However some sulfates are so good at their job, they can wash off your skin’s own natural oils that keep it moisturised and protected which can lead to dryness and irritation. Most people will find no issues with sulfate, however if you find your skin doesn’t like sulfates then free feel to avoid them by looking out for the sulfate-free icon on Skincarisma.

Which ingredients are classified as sulfates?

We’ve taken the Sulfates which are considered more harsh for our Sulfate-Free status. A product will be Sulfate-Free if it does not contain any of the following Sulfates:

  • TEA-Dodecylbenzenesulfonate
  • Ammonium Laureth Sulfate
  • Sodium Lauryl Sulfate
  • PEG-15 Cocamine
  • Sodium Laureth Sulfate
  • Sodium Cocoyl Sarcosinate
  • Sodium C14-16 Olefin Sulfonate
  • Dioctyl Sodium Sulfosuccinate
  • Ammonium Xylenesulfonate
  • Ammonium Lauryl Sulfate
  • Sodium Xylenesulfonate
  • Sodium Myreth Sulfate
  • Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate
Alcohol-Free

M. Asam Aqua Intense Supreme Hyaluron Cream contains a SkinCarisma flagged Alcohol

Understanding Simple Alcohols

Alcohol ingredients are widely used in cosmetics and come in different types. For the most part alcohols are not problematic at all. However one type of alcohols, simple alcohols can be quite drying to the skin because it evaporates very quickly. This can cause irritation which can also lead to other skin complications. These alcohols should never be used alone on your skin, but combined with other cosmetic ingredients, they are normally without issue. However, for some people with sensitive and easily irritable skin, avoiding products with these simple alcohols may be beneficial. If you find your skin doesn’t like these simple alcohols, then free feel to avoid them by looking out for the Alcohol-Free icon.

Which Ingredients are classified as Alcohol?

A product will be alcohol-free if it does not contain any of the following alcohol ingredients:

  • SD Alcohol
  • Alcohol Denat
  • Isopropyl Alcohol
  • Alcohol
Silicone-Free

M. Asam Aqua Intense Supreme Hyaluron Cream contains a SkinCarisma flagged Silicone

Understanding Silicones

If you’ve ever used a skincare, makeup or beauty product that’s made your skin look and feel smoother tempoarily – it’s likely contained Silicone. They are a popular class of ingredients found in cosmetics due to their smooth, soft, easy-to-spread and smooth properties that help creates an artificial layer/barrier on top of skin or hair (commonly found in conditioners).

For the same reasons they are popularly used, they are also commonly avoided. Anecdotally, many individuals have reported that Silicones cause/excerbate breakouts, irritation, cause a feeling of skin being unable to breathe, cause clumping of cosmetic products and find it difficult to wash off. As a result, those who find them problematic are avoiding them and increasingly, cosmetic companies are avoiding them as well.

If you have had bad experiences with Silicones in the past, or suspect they are problematic then look out for the tick on the Silicone-free label.

Disclaimer

The Silicone-free label only includes the most common Silicone ingredients that have indentified been reported by individuals that could potentially cause issues.

These include: Amodimethicone, Behenoxy Dimethicone, Bis-Aminopropyl Dimethicone, Cetearyl Methicone, Cetyl Dimethicone, Cyclomethicone, Cyclopentasiloxane, Dimethicone, Dimethicone Copolyol, Dimethiconol, Methicone, Phenyl Trimethicone, Phenyl Trimethicone, Stearoxy Dimethicone, Stearyl Dimethicone, Trimethylsilylamodimethicone.

Note, that this does not include all ingredients part of the Silicone class of ingredients.

EU Allergen-Free

M. Asam Aqua Intense Supreme Hyaluron Cream is free from SkinCarisma flagged Allergens

Understanding the Identified Contact Allergens

The EU’s Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS) has identified and established 26 cosmetic ingredients that are likely contact allergens (potential to cause skin allergies) as demonstrated in clinical or epidemiological studies. The EU’s SCCS have recommend cosmetic companies to disclose them on the labels if used and in cases where the concentration exceeds 0.001% in leave-on products and 0.01% in rinse-off products, then they must be labelled.

Look out for the tick on the EU-Allergen free label to know your cosmetic is free from any of the 26 identified cosmetic ingredients.

For more information regarding the EU’s Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety, please visit their official website.

Disclaimer

The EU Allergen Free label is for the 26 ingredients identified by the EU SCCS and products will be only flagged if a suspected ingredient is on it’s ingredient list. It is possible for cosmetics to contain one of the suspect ingredients without it appearing on the ingredient list due to it not reaching the concentration threshold to disclose it and cosmetic manufacturers choice to not disclose it.

Also note, the EU Allergen Free label is not personalized for your own allergies you may have and it does not constitute as medical advice. For your specific case, always consult your medical professiona such as dermatologist, physician, pharmacist, or health care provider – please read our medical disclaimer for more information.

Fungal Acne (Malassezia) Safe

M. Asam Aqua Intense Supreme Hyaluron Cream contains a SkinCarisma flagged potentially Fungal-Acne feeding Ingredient

Understanding Fungal Acne (Pityrosporum Folliculitis/Malassezia Folliculitis)

Pityrosporum Folliculitis/Malassezia folliculitis or simply known as Fungal Acne is a persistent acne-like condition that commonly responds poorly to traditional acne-treating methods. Unlike most cases of Acne where bacteria is the culprit, Fungi is the culprit of Fungal Acne (Hence the name!). There are certain classes & groups of ingredients that have been shown to promote and feed the growth of the Fungal Acne, Fungi such as fatty acids, oils, esters, polysorbates and fermented ingredients.

For more information regarding Fungal Acne, please visit Simple Skincare Science (f.c) – #3 of our Recommend Skincare Resources for an amazing comprehensive guide!

Please Read: How to use the Fungal Acne (Malassezia) Label

At SkinCarisma, we’ve done our best to identify as many ingredients as possible but note the fungal-free label may not be 100% accurate due to the complexconditions and combination of ingredients that malezzeria can thrive on.

Additionally, products that may contain ingredients that have shown to feed Malassezia may not neccessarily exacerbate the condition due to concentration of ingredient used in the product, this information is simply not available on the products.

As a result, please note this is only an experimental label that can be best used to possible identify problematic products you have used in the past. It is in no way a perfect identifier nor a predictor in whether or not it will exacerbate or cause fungal acne. It will continue to be worked on as more information and research comes to light.

If you find any ingredients you believe should be included, please email us at [email protected]

Disclaimer

Due to the lack of substantial research into this area it is very likely there are other ingredients and class/groups of ingredients that could feed Fungal Acne which have not been indentified.

The Fungal-Safe label does not constitute as medical advice. For your specific case, always consult your medical professiona such as dermatologist, physician, pharmacist, or health care provider – please read our medical disclaimer for more information.