Cicatricure Anti-Wrinkle EYE Cream Reviews


If you think that anything we present here regarding Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream is irrelevant, incorrect, misleading, or erroneous, then please let us know promptly! We’re here for you all the time. Contact us here. Or You can read more about us to see our vision.

Do you get stressed out thinking about shopping for a great Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream? Do doubts keep creeping into your mind? We understand, because we’ve already gone through the whole process of researching Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream, which is why we have assembled a comprehensive list of the greatest Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream available in the current market. We’ve also come up with a list of questions that you probably have yourself.

We’ve done the best we can with our thoughts and recommendations, but it’s still crucial that you do thorough research on your own for Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream that you consider buying. Your questions might include the following:

  • Is it worth buying an Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream?
  • What benefits are there with buying an Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream?
  • What factors deserve consideration when shopping for an effective Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream ?
  • Why is it crucial to invest in any Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream, much less the best one?
  • Which Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream are good in the current market?
  • Where can you find information like this about Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream ?

We’re convinced that you likely have far more questions than just these regarding Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream, and the only real way to satisfy your need for knowledge is to get information from as many reputable online sources as you possibly can.

Potential sources can include buying guides for Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream, rating websites, word-of-mouth testimonials, online forums, and product reviews. Thorough and mindful research is crucial to making sure you get your hands on the best-possible Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream. Make sure that you are only using trustworthy and credible websites and sources.

We provide an Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream buying guide, and the information is totally objective and authentic. We employ both AI and big data in proofreading the collected information. How did we create this buying guide? We did it using a custom-created selection of algorithms that lets us manifest a top-10 list of the best available Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream currently available on the market.

This technology we use to assemble our list depends on a variety of factors, including but not limited to the following:

  1. Brand Value: Every brand of Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream has a value all its own. Most brands offer some sort of unique selling proposition that’s supposed to bring something different to the table than their competitors.
  2. Features: What bells and whistles matter for an Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream?
  3. Specifications: How powerful they are can be measured.
  4. Product Value: This simply is how much bang for the buck you get from your Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream.
  5. Customer Ratings: Number ratings grade Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream objectively.
  6. Customer Reviews: Closely related to ratings, these paragraphs give you first-hand and detailed information from real-world users about their Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream.
  7. Product Quality: You don’t always get what you pay for with an Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream, sometimes less, and sometimes more.
  8. Product Reliability: How sturdy and durable an Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream is should be an indication of how long it will work out for you.

We always remember that maintaining Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream information to stay current is a top priority, which is why we are constantly updating our websites. Learn more about us using online sources.

If you think that anything we present here regarding Cicatricure Anti Wrinkle Cream is irrelevant, incorrect, misleading, or erroneous, then please let us know promptly! We’re here for you all the time. Contact us here. Or You can read more about us to see our vision.

Q: What are the best wrinkle treatment products?

A: Botox, Dysport or Xeoming are useful for smoothing wrinkles on the forehead, frown lines, and crow’s feet, while fillers are best for wrinkles around the mouth such as nasolabial folds and marionette lines.

Q: What is the best face cream for deep wrinkles?

A: Retinol face cream may help reduce the appearance of wrinkles. Botox injections work best on wrinkles caused by habitual facial movement such as forehead wrinkles. A diagram of younger and older skin showing the decrease in collagen in older skin.

Q: What is the best deep wrinkle repair?

A: Milk powder is one of the best home remedies for wrinkles on face. The nutrients present in milk powder penetrate deep into the layers of the skin and rejuvenates the skin giving it a young and healthy glow.

Q: What is deep wrinkle cream?

A: The Best Deep Wrinkle Creams for the Face Dr. Denese New York Triple Strength Wrinkle Smoother. … Neutrogena Ageless Intensives Deep Wrinkle Moisture Night. … Olay Regenerist Filling & Sealing Wrinkle Treatment. … ROC Retinol Correxion Deep Wrinkle Filler. …

When looking at the different products, be sure to ask yourself why you want this. If it’s just for a one-time use and then you can get by with something cheaper than if its going into daily usage or if investing more could make all the difference in getting quality results from your purchase.

How to choose best Cicatricure Eye Cream

1. Price

Amazon offers great deals for products when you buy them in combos, so make sure to browse through several sellers and find the best deal.”Price will significantly influence which Cicatricure Eye Cream (Amazon Brand Book) you settle on as it’s a deciding factor of most.” “Some sellers may price their item differently based upon various reasons such shipping costs or taxes; however Amazon has some really appealing prices that could be right up your alley!”

2. Brand

Another determining factor when it comes to buying Sundown X 12 V2 is the brand. Well-known brands for Sundown X 12 V2 will most likely be more expensive than lesser-known brands, but that is because the quality of their product is known and can be depended upon. Depending on the product you want, the brand may make a massive difference when it comes to durability, efficiency, and quality.

3. Function

When looking at the different products, be sure to ask yourself why you want this. If it’s just for a one-time use and then you can get by with something cheaper than if its going into daily usage or if investing more could make all the difference in getting quality results from your purchase.

4. Old Customer Review

5. Pros and Cons of product.

It is always important to consider the pros and cons of a product before you buy it. If there are any disadvantages that may arise from using this item, then buying one will be quite disappointing for both yourself as well as other people who were looking forward in owning an Cicatricure Eye Cream themselves! Make sure by doing some research about these products online or through social media with friends/family members so they know what could go wrong if their wanted something too badly without knowing all its flaws beforehand – which can save them time & money down the line when returning items later on after discovering why not everything worked out just right.

6. Service

How long you intend to use Cicatricure Eye Cream also matters. Check the product description to see how long you can expect Cicatricure Eye Cream to serve you at total capacity and if you will have to repair or replace it afterward. Compare this period and ask yourself whether it is worth buying or you can get a more expensive one that will last for a longer period.

7. Warranty

Lastly, if you want to be sure your product arrives without any problems then shipping with an Cicatricure Eye Cream is always better. They will take responsibility for damaged goods and can even let people return the item if it didn’t work out as planned!

Be sure to consider the functionality of a cicatricure eye contour before making a purchase. A cicatricure eye contour’s functionality is usually determined by the specifications it contains. As the specs become more sophisticated, the functionality increases.

Prior to Buying Your First cicatricure eye contour, Consider the Following Factors.

Many people prefer buying products from Amazon for a reason. The most credible platform, Amazon sells a variety of laptops and also deals directly with manufacturers. As such, you will get your laptop directly from the manufacturer instead of buying it from a retailer.

With Amazon, you can work with manufacturers all around the world. Among the good things about Amazon is its detailed guide to every type of laptop. Each cicatricure eye contour will be described clearly. By doing this, you are easily able to make an informed decision.

You can find details in the guide such as the brand, size, function and other features of cicatricure eye contours you’re interested in. In the event that you are looking for a cicatricure eye contour that includes specific features, Amazon offers the best search tools. That’s all you’ve got All you need to do is enter your favorite features and your screen will display the laptops that fit your preferences.

Despite the best efforts of Rresourcecenterchicago with its thoughts and recommendations, it’s still crucial that you do thorough research on your own for cicatricure eye contours you’re considering purchasing. You might ask the following questions:

  • Does buying a cicatricure eye contour make sense?
  • Why do we need to buy cicatricure eye contours?
  • What are the factors to consider when shopping for effective cicatricure eye contours?
  • What are the benefits of investing in a cicatricure eye contour, much less the best one?
  • Which cicatricure eye contours are popular right now?
  • What is the best place to find information like this about cicatricure eye contours?

We believe you have many more questions than these concerning cicatricure eye contour , and the only way to satisfy your need for knowledge is to get information from as many reputable online sources as possible.

Bottom line: If you wanna get serious about retinoids, RP is not your ingredient (retinol or tretinoin is!). However, if you use a product that you like and it also contains RP, there is no reason to throw it away. If possible use it at night, just to be on the safe side.

Cicatricure anti wrinkle eye cream reviews

Good old water, aka H2O. The most common skincare ingredient of all. You can usually find it right in the very first spot of the ingredient list, meaning it’s the biggest thing out of all the stuff that makes up the product.

It’s mainly a solvent for ingredients that do not like to dissolve in oils but rather in water.

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Once inside the skin, it hydrates, but not from the outside – putting pure water on the skin (hello long baths!) is drying.

One more thing: the water used in cosmetics is purified and deionized (it means that almost all of the mineral ions inside it is removed). Like this, the products can stay more stable over time.

A goldish to dark yellow emollient plant oil coming from Sesame seeds. Similar to many other plant oils, it contains high amounts of nourishing and moisturizing fatty acids (about 38% of oleic and 48% of linoleic acid) and is a nice oil to repair and regenerate dry skin. It is rapidly absorbed and gives the skin a soft and gentle feel.

An often used emollient with a light and silky feel. It’s very mild to both skin and eyes and spreads nicely and easily. It’s often used in sunscreens as it’s also an excellent solvent for sunscreen agents.

A super common emollient that makes your skin feel nice and smooth. It comes from coconut oil and glycerin, it’s light-textured, clear, odorless and non-greasy. It’s a nice ingredient that just feels good on the skin, is super well tolerated by every skin type and easy to formulate with. No wonder it’s popular.

  • A natural moisturizer that’s also in our skin
  • A super common, safe, effective and cheap molecule used for more than 50 years
  • Not only a simple moisturizer but knows much more: keeps the skin lipids between our skin cells in a healthy (liquid crystal) state, protects against irritation, helps to restore barrier
  • Effective from as low as 3% with even more benefits at higher concentrations up to 20-40% (around 10% is a good usability-effectiveness sweet spot)
  • High-glycerin moisturizers are awesome for treating severely dry skin

A super common, waxy, white, solid stuff that helps water and oil to mix together, gives body to creams and leaves the skin feeling soft and smooth.

Chemically speaking, it is the attachment of a glycerin molecule to the fatty acid called stearic acid. It can be produced from most vegetable oils (in oils three fatty acid molecules are attached to glycerin instead of just one like here) in a pretty simple, “green” process that is similar to soap making. It’s readily biodegradable.

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It also occurs naturally in our body and is used as a food additive. As cosmetic chemist Colins writes it, “its safety really is beyond any doubt”.

A very common water-loving surfactant and emulsifier that helps to keep water and oil mixed nicely together.

It’s often paired with glyceryl stearate – the two together form a super effective emulsifier duo that’s salt and acid tolerant and works over a wide pH range. It also gives a “pleasing product aesthetics”, so no wonder it’s popular.

A popular, vegetable-derived oil-loving emulsifier that helps water to mix with oil. In itself, it is suitable for water-in-oil emulsions (where water droplets are dispersed in oil), but it is more often used as a co-emulsifier next to other, water-loving emulsifiers.

Chemically speaking, it comes from the attachment of sorbitan (a dehydrated sorbitol (sugar) molecule) with the fatty acid Stearic Acid, that creates a partly water (the sorbitan part) and partly oil soluble (stearic part) molecule.

An extremely common multitasker ingredient that gives your skin a nice soft feel (emollient) and gives body to creams and lotions. It also helps to stabilize oil-water mixes (emulsions), though it does not function as an emulsifier in itself. Its typical use level in most cream type formulas is 2-3%.

It’s a so-called fatty alcohol, a mix of cetyl and stearyl alcohol, other two emollient fatty alcohols. Though chemically speaking, it is alcohol (as in, it has an -OH group in its molecule), its properties are totally different from the properties of low molecular weight or drying alcohols such as denat. alcohol. Fatty alcohols have a long oil-soluble (and thus emollient) tail part that makes them absolutely non-drying and non-irritating and are totally ok for the skin.

A common functional ingredient that helps to keep the oil-loving and water-loving ingredients together (emulsifier), stabilizes and thickens the products.

Chemically speaking, it is ethoxylated Cetearyl alcohol, meaning that some ethylene oxide is added to the fatty alcohol to increase the water-soluble part in the molecule. The result is that the mainly oil soluble, emollient fatty alcohol is converted to an emulsifier molecule that keeps oil and water mixed in creams. The number in the name of Ceteareth emulsifiers refers to the average number of ethylene oxide molecules added and 20 makes a good emulsifier.

A common multi-tasker fatty acid. It makes your skin feel nice and smooth (emollient), gives body to cream type products and helps to stabilize water and oil mixes (aka emulsions).

Butylene glycol, or let’s just call it BG, is a multi-tasking colorless, syrupy liquid. It’s a great pick for creating a nice feeling product.

BG’s main job is usually to be a solvent for the other ingredients. Other tasks include helping the product to absorb faster and deeper into the skin (penetration enhancer), making the product spread nicely over the skin (slip agent), and attracting water (humectant) into the skin.

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It’s an ingredient whose safety hasn’t been questioned so far by anyone (at least not that we know about). BG is approved by Ecocert and is also used enthusiastically in natural products. BTW, it’s also a food additive.

It’s pretty much the current IT-preservative. It’s safe and gentle, but even more importantly, it’s not a feared-by-everyone-mostly-without-scientific-reason paraben.

It’s not something new: it was introduced around 1950 and today it can be used up to 1% worldwide. It can be found in nature – in green tea – but the version used in cosmetics is synthetic.

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Other than having a good safety profile and being quite gentle to the skin it has some other advantages too. It can be used in many types of formulations as it has great thermal stability (can be heated up to 85°C) and works on a wide range of pH levels (ph 3-10).

It’s often used together with ethylhexylglycerin as it nicely improves the preservative activity of phenoxyethanol.

Theobroma means “food of the gods” in Greek though probably “treat of the people” would be more spot on. The cacao fruits and especially the seeds in it need no introduction as everyone knows them as the magical raw material of the magical sweet treat, chocolate (the flavour is composed of more than 1200(!) substances, and the exact chemical nature of it is not really understood, so it’s indeed magic. :)).

As for skincare, cocoa butter counts as a rich emollient that can moisturize and nourish even the driest skin (think chapped hands or lips). It’s solid at room temperature and melts nicely when you smear it on. It’s loaded with good-for-the-skin things: it contains fatty acids, mainly oleic (35%), stearic (34%), and palmitic (25%) and it also has antioxidant vitamin E and polyphenols.

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An ex-vivo (made on human skin but not on real people) study examined the cocoa polyphenols and found that 0.5-0.75% of them improved skin tone and elasticity and had a similarly positive impact on GAGs (important natural moisturizing factors in the skin) and collagen synthesis than a commercial high-end moisturizer (it was an Estee Lauder one).

All in all, cocoa butter is a goodie, especially for very dry skin.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

  • It’s a helper ingredient that improves the freeze-thaw stability of products
  • It’s also a solvent, humectant and to some extent a penetration enhancer
  • It has a bad reputation among natural cosmetics advocates but cosmetic scientists and toxicology experts do not agree (read more in the geeky details section)

It’s the most commonly used version of pure vitamin E in cosmetics. You can read all about the pure form here. This one is the so-called esterified version.

According to famous dermatologist, Leslie Baumann while tocopheryl acetate is more stable and has a longer shelf life, it’s also more poorly absorbed by the skin and may not have the same awesome photoprotective effects as pure Vit E.

A chemically chopped up version of wheat protein that consists mainly of amino acids (the building blocks), peptides (a couple of amino acids together), and proteins (lots of amino acids together).

It has moisturizing and film-forming properties and might be able to counteract the irritating effects of cleansing agents in cleansers and shampoos. It can also condition and repair damaged hair leaving it soft, silky and smooth.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

A big molecule created from repeated subunits (a polymer of acrylic acid) that magically converts a liquid into a nice gel formula. It usually has to be neutralized with a base (such as sodium hydroxide) for the thickening to occur and it creates viscous, clear gels that also feel nice and non-tacky on the skin. No wonder, it is a very popular and common ingredient. Typically used at 1% or less in most formulations.

A controversial preservative that has formaldehyde-releasing properties. It works great against bacteria and also has mild fungicide abilities.

Cosmetic chemist, Colin wrote a great article about formaldehyde and DMDM Hydantoin. He writes that formaldehyde is the perfect example of “the dose makes the poison” principle. It’s a natural stuff that can also be found in fresh fruits and vegetables, and eating it in tiny amounts is totally ok. However, in larger amounts (according to Wikipedia 30 mL of a solution containing 37% formaldehyde) it’s deadly.

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The amount of formaldehyde used in cosmetics either neat or through formaldehyde-releasing preservatives is tiny. Probably that is why the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Broad concluded both in 1988 and in 2008 that DMDM Hydantoin is “safe as used in cosmetics“.

However, Colins argues that in the case of formaldehyde-releasing preservatives, formaldehyde is released slowly and the skin has probably not evolved to deal with that. The lingering formaldehyde might be toxic to the Langerhans Cells that are important for the skin’s defense system. Another potential issue is that formaldehyde-releasers might also release other things while reacting with amino acids in the skin that is probably the explanation why some people are not allergic to formaldehyde but are allergic to formaldehyde-releasing preservatives. These are all theories, far from proven facts, but we feel that there are some justified reasons why formaldehyde-releasing preservatives and Dmdm Hydantoin count as controversial.

All in all, it’s up to you to decide if you wanna avoid this preservative group or not. If so, there are other, less risky and more skin-friendly options out there.

The most common type of feared-by-everyone-mostly-without-scientific-reason parabens. It’s a cheap, effective and well-tolerated ingredient to make sure the cosmetic formula does not go wrong too soon.

Apart from the general controversy around parabens (we wrote about it more here), there is a 2006 in-vitro (made in the lab not on real people) research about methylparaben (MP) showing that when exposed to sunlight, MP treated skin cells suffered more harm than non-MP treated skin cells. The study was not done with real people on real skin but still – using a good sunscreen next to MP containing products is a good idea. (Well, in fact using a sunscreen is always a good idea. :))

A very common type of feared-by-everyone-mostly-without-scientific-reason parabens. It’s a cheap, effective and well-tolerated ingredient to make sure the cosmetic formula does not go wrong too soon.

It’s one of the most commonly used thickeners and emulsion stabilizers. If the product is too runny, a little xanthan gum will make it more gel-like. Used alone, it can make the formula sticky and it is a good team player so it is usually combined with other thickeners and so-called rheology modifiers (helper ingredients that adjust the flow and thus the feel of the formula). The typical use level of Xantha Gum is below 1%, it is usually in the 0.1-0.5% range.

Btw, Xanthan gum is all natural, a chain of sugar molecules (polysaccharide) produced from individual sugar molecules (glucose and sucrose) via fermentation. It’s approved by Ecocert and also used in the food industry (E415).

The unfancy name for it is lye. It’s a solid white stuff that’s very alkaline and used in small amounts to adjust the pH of the product and make it just right.

For example, in case of AHA or BHA exfoliants, the right pH is super-duper important, and pH adjusters like sodium hydroxide are needed.

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BTW, lye is not something new. It was already used by ancient Egyptians to help oil and fat magically turn into something else. Can you guess what? Yes, it’s soap. It still often shows up in the ingredient list of soaps and other cleansers.

Sodium hydroxide in itself is a potent skin irritant, but once it’s reacted (as it is usually in skin care products, like exfoliants) it is totally harmless.

Exactly what it sounds: nice smelling stuff put into cosmetic products so that the end product also smells nice. Fragrance in the US and parfum in the EU is a generic term on the ingredient list that is made up of 30 to 50 chemicals on average (but it can have as much as 200 components!).

If you are someone who likes to know what you put on your face then fragrance is not your best friend – there’s no way to know what’s really in it.

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Also, if your skin is sensitive, fragrance is again not your best friend. It’s the number one cause of contact allergy to cosmetics. It’s definitely a smart thing to avoid with sensitive skin (and fragrance of any type – natural is just as allergic as synthetic, if not worse!).

Super common little helper ingredient that helps products to remain nice and stable for a longer time. It does so by neutralizing the metal ions in the formula (that usually get into there from water) that would otherwise cause some not so nice changes.

It is typically used in tiny amounts, around 0.1% or less.

It’s an ester form of vitamin A (retinol + palmitic acid) that belongs to the “retinoid family”. The retinoid family is pretty much the royal family of skincare, with the queen being the FDA-approved anti-aging ingredient tretinoin. Retinol is also a very famous member of the family, but it’s like Prince William, two steps away from the throne. Retinyl palmitate will be then little Prince George, quite far (3 steps) away from the throne.

By steps, we mean metabolic steps. Tretinoin, aka retinoic acid, is the active ingredient our skin cells can understand and retinyl palmitate (RP) has to be converted by our metabolic machinery to actually do something. The conversion is a 3 step one and looks like this:

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retinyl palmitate –> retinol — > retinaldehyde –> all-trans-retinoic acid

As we wrote in our lengthy retinol description the problem is that the conversion is not terribly effective. The evidence that RP is still an effective anti-aging ingredient is not very strong, in fact, it’s weak. Dr. Leslie Baumann in her fantastic Cosmetic Dermatology book writes that RP is topically ineffective.

What’s more, the anti-aging effectiveness is not the only questionable thing about RP. It also exibits questionable behaviour in the presence of UV light and was the center of a debate between the non-profit group, EWG (whose intentions are no doubt good, but its credibility is often questioned by scientists) and a group of scientists and dermatologists lead by Steven Q. Wang, MD, director of dermatologic surgery at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre.

Dr. Leslie Baumann wrote a great review of the debate and summarized the research available about retinyl palmitate here. It seems that there is a study showing RP being photo protective against UVB rays but there is also a study showing RP causing DNA damage and cytotoxicity in association with UVA.

We think that the truth lies somewhere in the middle, and we agree with Dr. Baumann’s conclusion: “sufficient evidence to establish a causal link between RP and skin cancer has not been produced. Nor, I’m afraid, are there any good reasons to recommend the use of RP“. We would add especially during the day!

Bottom line: If you wanna get serious about retinoids, RP is not your ingredient (retinol or tretinoin is!). However, if you use a product that you like and it also contains RP, there is no reason to throw it away. If possible use it at night, just to be on the safe side.

The extract coming from the popular garden plant Calendula or Marigold. According to manufacturer info, it’s used for many centuries for its exceptional healing powers and is particularly remarkable in the treatment of wounds. It contains flavonoids that give the plant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

You probably know yeast from the kitchen where you put it into milk with a little sugar and then after a couple of minutes brownish bubbles form. That is the fungi fermenting the sugar.

As for skin care, yeast contains beta-glucan that is a great soothing ingredient and also a mild antioxidant. The yeast extract itself is a silky clear liquid that has some great moisturizing, skin protecting and film-forming properties on the skin.

Centella Asiatica – or gotu kola as normal people call it – has been used in folk medicine for hundreds of years. It’s traditionally used to improve small wounds, burns and scratches and it’s also a well known anti-inflammatory agent for eczema.

Recently science has taken an interest in Gotu Kola as well and it turns out it really has many active compounds with several benefits. Just for hard-core geeks, the main biologically active compounds are pentacyclic triterpenoid saponins called asiaticoside, madecassoside, asiatic and madecassic acid (also called centellosides).

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One of the biological activities of the centellosides is to be able to stimulate GAGs (glycosaminoglycans – polysaccharides that are part of the liquidy stuff between our skin cells), and especially hyaluronic acid synthesis in our skin. This is probably one of the reasons why Centella Asiatica Extract has nice skin moisturizing properties that was confirmed by a 25 people, four weeks study along with Centella’s anti-inflammatory effects.

Madecassoside can also help in burn wound healing through increasing antioxidant activity and enhancing collagen synthesis. Asiaticoside was shown to increase antioxidant levels on rats skin when applied at 0.2%.

Centella Asiatica also often shows up in products that try to treat cellulite or striae. Of course, it cannot make a miracle but it might have some effect via regulating microcirculation and normalizing the metabolism in the cells of connective tissues.

Bottom line: Gotu Kola is a great plant ingredient with proven wound healing, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Nice to spot on any ingredient list.

It’s a common little helper ingredient that helps water and oil to mix together. Also, it can help to increase the solubility of some other ingredients in the formula.

A common colorant that gives products a nice red color.

Ci 19140 or Tartrazine is a super common colorant in skincare, makeup, medicine & food. It’s a synthetic lemon yellow that’s used alone or mixed with other colors for special shades.

FDA says it’s possible, but rare, to have an allergic-type reaction to a color additive. As an example, it mentions that Ci 19140 may cause itching and hives in some people but the colorant is always labeled so that you can avoid it if you are sensitive.

If you see a cosmetic product that claims that it has “Botox-like effect” then two things are almost certain: one, the product overpromises and two, it contains Argireline.

So this one is the famous peptide that’s marketed by its manufacturer as the “Botox in a jar”. The basis for this claim is that it targets the same wrinkle forming mechanism (wrinkles caused by facial muscle movement) as Botox, but the way it works is very different. In addition, the extent to which it can prevent muscles from contracting (and to smooth wrinkles) is very different (otherwise why would anyone use still Botox?).

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The manufacturer did several studies to prove that Argireline really works and it does (just not as well as Botox). In-vivo (made on real people) tests showed that using 10% Argireline solution around the eyes for 15 days decreased wrinkles depth by 17%. A Spanish University also did some research and found that Argireline increased the level of skin moisturization and decreased both the depth and width of wrinkles “significantly”.

This means, Acetyl Hexapeptide-8 does have some ability to smooth wrinkles (but not as well as Botox – sorry, if we sound like a broken record). Also, we have to agree with TruthInAging, that it’s not a collagen builder and not a preventer of structural aging (think vitamin C, AHAs or retinol); it’s just a quick fix. If you are looking for one, this could be your thing. If you are more of a “let’s treat this aging thing properly” type, then it’s probably not your thing.

CI 42090 or Blue 1 is a super common synthetic colorant in beauty & food. Used alone, it adds a brilliant smurf-like blue color, combined with Tartrazine, it gives the fifty shades of green.

A very common type of feared-by-everyone-mostly-without-scientific-reason paraben. It’s a cheap, effective and well-tolerated ingredient to make sure the cosmetic formula does not go wrong too soon. Read more about parabens here >>

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

A really famous peptide that is part of Matrixyl 3000, the most sold peptide complex in the word. Before we go and find out what the big deal with Matrixyl 3000 is, let’s just focus on Palmitoyl Tripeptide-1 itself for a bit.

It’s a small three amino acid (they are the building blocks of all proteins) peptide with the amino sequence of glycine-histidine-lysine, or GHK. GHK is attached to palmitic acid (a fatty acid) to increase oil solubility and skin penetration.

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The GHK part is the important one as it’s a type I collagen fragment. When collagen naturally breaks down in the skin, the resulting peptide fragments signal to the skin that it should get to work and create some nice, new collagen. Adding in collagen fragment peptides, like GHK, might trick the skin into thinking that collagen has broken down and it’s time to create some more.

Therefore, Palmitoyl Tripeptide-1 is believed to be able to stimulate collagen production in the skin, and more collagen means fewer wrinkles and younger looking skin.

In Matrixyl 3000, Palmitoyl Tripeptide-1 is coupled with Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7 and the duo works in synergy to reduce wrinkles and give younger looking skin. According to the manufacturer’s in-vivo (made on real people) test, applying 3% Matrixyl 3000 twice a day for 2 months resulted in all of the following things:

  • 39.4% reduction in surface occupied by deep wrinkles
  • 32.9% reduction in main wrinkle density
  • 19.9% reduction in main wrinkle average depth
  • 16% improvement in roughness
  • 16.2% in lifting effect
  • 5.5% improvement in elasticity
  • 15.5% improvement in skin tone

Manufacturer results, of course, always have to be taken with a pinch of salt, but if you like peptides, the Matryxil 3000 duo is one of the best-proven and most well-known ones and it’s something that is worth trying.


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