MOAPPP Announcements

MOAPPP's Annual Report

Annual ReportMOAPPP is pleased to announce the publication of its 2008-2009 Annual Report! We encourage you to take a moment to learn about the scope of our work. You may view the report online, download it in PDF format or request a print copy from this webpage.

 

 

 

 

 

 


MOAPPP Annual Conference


Register today and save!

Click here to download the conference brochure (PDF) or register online. Registration by U.S. Mail and Fax are also accepted.

This year we have an impressive lineup of speakers, presentations, exhibits, networking opportunities, entertainment and more. The conference is Minnesota's most comprehensive training event covering current research, educational resources, policy initiatives and emerging issues related to adolescent sexual health, pregnancy prevention and support for adolescent parents. It provides participants with accurate, up-to-the-minute information and skill-building workshops as well as inspiration and motivation.

Register by Friday April 16 to receive the reduced rate for "early birds."


Thanks to these generous sponsors for their support of our 18th Annual Conference!

Leader Level

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Funding made possible in part by cooperative agreement #5U58DP524993-05
  • Children's Trust Fund, Minnesota Department of Human Services

Advocate Level

  • Maternal and Child Health Section, Minnesota Department of Health

Partner Level

  • Center for Leadership Education in Maternal and Child Health Program, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota
  • Community Action of Minneapolis
  • Greater Twin Cities United Way
  • HealthPartners
  • Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department
  • Minneapolis Department of Health and Family Support
  • Minnesota Department of Education
  • Minnesota Prevention Resource Center
  • Planned Parenthood - Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota
  • Sexual Violence Prevention Program, Minnesota Department of Health
  • STD and HIV Section, Minnesota Department of Health

Teen dadsPractical Tips for Engaging Teen Dads
May 5, 2010
10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Do you now, or have you ever considered providing support and education to young fathers? Register for this pre-conference institute and you will receive information you can use to get started or to expand and sustain a quality program. Hector Sanchez-Flores, Senior Research Associate with the Institute for Health Policy Studies of the University of California San Francisco, and a panel of local experts will offer guidance and practical tips in your work to meet the needs of Minnesota young fathers and their children. Networking Happy Hour with appetizers and cash bar follows. Scholarships available.

For more information and registration details, see the event flyer. Click here to register online. Presented by MOAPPP and Minnesota Young Fathers Action Collaborative (MYFAC).


Save the date for MOAPPP's 2010 Fundraiser..."Let's Give Them Something to Talk About!"

June 10, 2010
Cocktails and light dinner buffet at Uptown Minneapolis' fabulous FIVE Event Center
From 6:30-9 p.m.

Featuring teens and adults who have a little something to say about sexual health and adolescence. Enjoy a small but selective silent auction, a provocative presentation by teens, and the opportunity to contribute your time and/or treasure. The evening wraps up to the exhilarating rhythms of DJ Eros. (Don't know her? You will after June 10th!) All proceeds will benefit MOAPPP and Minnesota teens.


MOAPPP Co-Sponsors Lecture with Dr. Joycelyn Elders
May 7, 2010 - 4:30 p.m.

Mayo Auditorium, University of Minnesota
425 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis

MOAPPP is co-sponsoring a lecture with former U.S. Surgeon General, Joycelyn Elders, MD, on the University of Minnesota campus. Her presentation "Revolutionizing Our Sexually Dysfunctional Society: Are Americans Ready to Talk, Listen, and Learn?" will cover the public health issue of sexual health and the fundamental changes required to move our society forward. This lecture is the inaugural event of the John Money Lecture in Pediatric Sexology hosted by the University of Minnesota's Program in Human Sexuality. For more information and directions to Mayo Auditorium, please visit the University's website.

Other Announcements

HHS Releases Funding Announcement for Evidence Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention

On Friday, April 2, 2010 the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) released guidelines for applying for the new teen pregnancy prevention initiative. The funding announcement contains details about the $75 million for competitive grants to replicate evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs, and includes a list of programs eligible for funding. View the announcement on the HHS website or download the PDF here. OAH is expected to release a separate announcement about the $25 million available for promising programs and innovative strategies at a later date.


Office of Adolescent Health Seeking Grant Reviewers

The Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is seeking reviewers for the grant applications anticipated in response to the funding announcement for the new teenage pregnancy prevention initiative. If you are interested in serving as a reviewer, read the attached letter from OAH for more information, complete the form and return it according to the instructions in the letter by April 20. Read the letter and application form (PDF).


Get a $20 Gift Card for Your Ideas on Women's Health

The University of Minnesota's School of Public Health is looking for women ages 18-26 to participate in focus groups on women's health. Participants will be asked to take part in a one-time-only discussion group lasting about two hours and will receive a $20 gift card to Target or Cub. Reimbursement for bus transportation to and from the group and a meal during the group will also be provided. For more information or to see if you are eligible, contact Nicole Brys at 612-750-4271 or brysx001@umn.edu.


National STD Awareness Month

National STD Awareness Month will take place in April 2010 and CDC will continue to host its site dedicated to the observance at www.cdcnpin.org. Other resource links include:

  • www.itsyoursexlife.com
  • www.cdc.gov
  • www.health.state.mn.us
  • www.wraptesttreat.com
  • www.nomasstds.com

Using Social Media to Improve Use of the Best Methods of Contraception

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy has released an RFP (PDF) to provide grants to entities who want to develop and/or test ways of raising awareness about long acting reversible methods of contraception (LARCs) through innovative uses of digital and social media.


National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month

Have you started planning how your organization will promote May as National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month (NTPPM)? It is not too late! Observed each May by states and communities throughout the country, NTPPM seeks to involve communities in promoting and supporting effective teen pregnancy prevention initiatives. Visit the National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month page on the MOAPPP website for resources and ideas.


May 5, 2010
The National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

Hundreds of thousands of teens nationwide are expected to participate in the ninth annual National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy on May 5, 2010. For ideas on promoting the National Day, please visit the National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy page on the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy website.

For Youth

Various Summer Dates, 2010
ThreeSixty Youth Journalism Camps

ThreeSixty brings diverse voices into journalism and related professions by using intense, personal instruction in the practice and principles of journalism. They strengthen the civic literacy, writing skills and college-readiness of Minnesota teens. Apply now for their summer journalism camps and prepare yourself to work for ThreeSixty's staff. For more information and to apply, visit www.threesixtyjournalism.org.

In the News

Select Media Will Publish Promoting Health Among Teens

Select Media has announced that they will publish the new abstinence-only curriculum, "Promoting Health Among Teens." The curriculum has received wide attention as the first abstinence program with strong evidence of delaying sexual activity among young teens. A press release from Select Media provides additional details about the curriculum designed for at-risk youth in grades 5-9. "Promoting Health Among Teens" is expected to be available for purchase this spring.


Health Care Reform Restores $250 Million in Funding to Failed Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs

Along with many positive components, the recently passed health care reform legislation included $250 million for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. Advocates are disappointed that Congress and the President have chosen to continue funding for these programs that have never been proven to be effective. Read more about this disappointing development in a blog by James Wagoner of Advocates for Youth at www.advocatesforyouth.org.

New Resources

Effective Programs for Latino Youth

This new research brief (PDF) from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy details eight programs that have been shown through careful evaluation to either delay sex, improve contraceptive use and/or reduce teen pregnancy. Some of the programs were designed specifically for Latino teens and some were not; those that were not designed specifically for Latinos either included Latino teens in the program evaluation population or were found to be particularly effective among Latino teens.


Guttmacher Institute Launches New State Data Center

The State Data Center is a new tool that allows researchers, advocates, policymakers and others working on reproductive health issues at the national or state level to build, download and print custom tables, graphs and maps of the most current information available. The available data include:

  • Trends in teen pregnancy, birth, abortion and miscarriage, by age and race/ethnicity
  • Current data on women in need of contractive services and services available
  • State policies relation to abortion, contraception, and minors' access to services

For more information, visit the State Data Center at www.guttmacher.org.


Making Proud Choices! Adaptation Kit Now Available

Are you implementing Making Proud Choices? If you want to make sure you're making adaptations that won't compromise the integrity of this science-based program, check out this new adaptation kit here. The kit contains:

  • BDI logic model for MPC
  • Core components
  • Green/yellow/red light adaptation guide
  • Fidelity and adaptation logs
  • An extensive resource list

Link Between Poverty and Teen Pregnancy

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy has released a policy brief (PDF) on the link between poverty and teen and unplanned pregnancy that includes recommendations and strategies to help teens and young adults delay childbearing until they are prepared to become parents.


Runaway and Homeless Youth and Relationship Violence Toolkit

Recognizing and understanding the intersection of runaway and homeless youth and intimate partner violence (including dating, domestic and sexual violence) is critical to creating meaningful services and effective intervention and prevention strategies for both homelessness and relationship abuse, and in creating partnerships between the programs working with youth at risk. This toolkit was developed by and for advocates in the runaway and homeless youth (RHY) and domestic and sexual assault (DV/SA) fields to help programs better address relationship violence with runaway and homeless youth.

New Research

What Works For Older Youth During The Transition To Adulthood: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions

This synthesis (PDF) examines the role that programs designed to serve older youth can play in promoting positive development and subsequent self-sufficiency in adulthood, and presents findings from 31 studies. This review indicates that education and career programs can be effective, especially for low-income youth and for youth targeted from younger ages. Furthermore, mentoring, case management, and providing childcare for young parents are associated with program success across outcomes. However, existing substance use and reproductive health programs have not consistently been found to be effective across outcomes for this age group.


Parental Support and Knowledge and Adolescents' Sexual Health

Using a representative sample of Dutch adolescents who had previously engaged in sexual intercourse, this study investigated age- and gender-specific associations between parental support and parental knowledge of the child's whereabouts, on the one hand, and sexual experience and sexual health (the ability to have safe and pleasurable sexual experiences) on the other hand. Both parental support and knowledge were positively associated with contraceptive use, social skills in sexual interactions, sexual satisfaction and delay of sexual debut. Findings also revealed that the majority of correlations between parental support and sexual experience and sexual health are attributable to the relationship between a supportive family environment and parental knowledge of the child's whereabouts. Parental knowledge thus appeared to be more important for healthy sexual development than parental support.


College Students and Unwanted Sex

This is the first study of unwanted sexual experiences in the collegiate "hooking-up" culture. In a representative sample of 178 students at a small liberal arts university, 23 percent of women and seven percent of men surveyed reported one or more experiences of unwanted sexual intercourse. Seventy-eight percent of unwanted vaginal, anal, and oral incidents took place while "hooking up," whereas 78 percent of unwanted fondling incidents occurred at parties or bars. The most frequently endorsed reason for unwanted sexual intercourse was impaired judgment due to alcohol. The most frequently endorsed reason for unwanted fondling was that it happened before the perpetrator could be stopped.


Sexual Risk Behavior Among the Adolescent Children of HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Drug-Abusing Fathers

Researchers aimed to achieve a greater understanding of the longitudinal predictors of sexual risk behavior among the adolescent children of HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative drug-abusing fathers. Greater perceived environmental hostility (discrimination and victimization), a weak father–child relationship, and greater adolescent maladjustment and substance use had direct pathways to adolescent sexual risk behavior. Findings suggest complex interrelationships among paternal, environmental, social, personal, and substance use factors as longitudinal predictors of sexual risk behavior in children whose fathers abuse or are dependent upon drugs. The importance of perceived environmental hostility, the father–child relationship, and adolescent maladjustment and substance use may have implications for public policy as well as prevention and treatment programs. Read the abstract here.


Factors Associated with Event Level Anal Sex and Condom Use During Anal Sex Among Adolescent Women

The authors examined factors associated with event-level heterosexual anal sex and of event-level condom use during anal sex among adolescent women. Heterosexual anal intercourse is a small but nonrandom event-level component in adolescent women's sexual behavior. About 30% of anal sex events were condom protected. Mood, partner, and situational factors predicted anal sex, but not condom use during anal sex. Findings suggest the importance of providers' screening adolescent women patients during office visits about anal sex and about condom use during anal sex, as well as asking questions about the context of these behaviors to appropriately tailor risk reduction counseling. Read the abstract here.


Point-of-Care Testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections Increases Awareness and Short-Term Abstinence in Adolescent Women

Researchers evaluated the effect of point-of-care (POC) testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) on reported awareness of test results and STI risk-reduction behaviors in adolescents. POC provides the clinician with the opportunity to give test results and appropriate treatment in an immediate and confidential manner, which decreases the interval between testing and treatment and could reduce disease transmission. A positive POC test result increased the proportion of subjects aware of being positive for an STI and the likelihood that subjects reported being abstinent. The authors conclude that awareness of STI results increases with POC testing. Effective communication of results can increase patient understanding and compliance with risk reduction strategies, which may affect STI rates. Read the abstract here.


Dating Violence Among High School Students

This study examined the associations among dating violence and selected health risk behaviors among high school students. Significant associations exist among dating violence and sexual behavior, substance use, violence, psychological health and unhealthy weight control. School nurses should be actively involved in promoting healthy lifestyles and healthy choices among high school students through interdisciplinary efforts with parents, teachers, school districts and communities.


Childhood Sexual Abuse and Cognitive Representations of Sexuality

Childhood sexual trauma has been demonstrated to increase survivors' risk for engaging in unrestricted sexual behaviors and experiencing adolescent sexual assault. This study examined cognitive representations of sexuality that might drive these behavioral patterns and found that a history of childhood sexual abuse impacted the way women viewed themselves as a sexual person. The findings also suggest that sexual self-views may serve to moderate the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and adolescent sexual assault.


Parents' Perspectives on Talking to Preteenage Children About Sex

Researchers attempted to elucidate parents' attitudes toward and experiences with communicating with their children about sex. They found that parents believed it is important to talk to their children about sex and believed that doing so can be effective, but many had not done so. Primary barriers were parents' perception that their children are too young and not knowing how to talk to their children about the subject. Parents found it easiest to talk to their children about sex if they had a good parent-child relationship, took advantage of opportunities to talk and began having the discussions when their children were very young. Some differences were noted by parents' race, ethnicity, gender and location. The authors conclude that interventions aimed at encouraging parents to talk to their children about sex should enhance parents' understanding of the stages of children's sexual development and focus on the parents of young children. In addition, interventions should support parents in a range of strategies that complement discussions about sex. Read the full article (PDF).


Sexual Orientation and Bullying Among Adolescents

Researchers examined associations between sexual orientation and past-year bully victimization and perpetration with heterosexuals as the referent group, stratifying by gender and controlling for age, race/ethnicity, and weight status. The authors conclude that there are significant differences in reports of bullying victimization and perpetration between heterosexual and sexual minority youth. Clinicians should inquire about sexual orientation and bullying, and coordinate care for youth who may need additional support. Read the abstract here.

MOAPPP Events

Teen dadsMay 5, 2010
Practical Tips for Engaging Teen Dads

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Brooklyn Center

Do you now, or have you ever considered providing support and education to young fathers? Register for this pre-conference institute and you will receive information you can use to get started or to expand and sustain a quality program. Hector Sanchez-Flores, Senior Research Associate with the Institute for Health Policy Studies of the University of California San Francisco, and a panel of local experts will offer guidance and practical tips in your work to meet the needs of Minnesota young fathers and their children. Networking Happy Hour with appetizers and cash bar follows. Scholarships available.

For more information and registration details, see the event flyer. Click here to register online. Presented by MOAPPP and Minnesota Young Fathers Action Collaborative (MYFAC).


MOAPPP Annual Conference

Join us for the 19th Annual MOAPPP Conference! Join more than 350 colleagues for two days of dynamic speakers, challenging workshops and countless opportunities for networking and conversation. To take advantage of the early registration discount, register by April 16, 2010. For more information and a conference brochure, visit the conference page.


May 7, 2010
University of Minnesota John Money Lecture with Dr. Jocelyn Elders

4:30 p.m.
Mayo Auditorium
425 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis

Former U.S. Surgeon General, Joycelyn Elders, MD, will deliver a lecture on "Revolutionizing Our Sexually Dysfunctional Society: Are Americans Ready to Talk, Listen, and Learn?" She will discuss the public health issue of sexual health and the fundamental changes required to move our society forward. This lecture is the inaugural event of the John Money Lecture in Pediatric Sexology hosted by the University of Minnesota's Program in Human Sexuality. For more information and directions to Mayo Auditorium, please visit the University's website.


July 20-22, 2010
Safer Choices: Training of Educators
NOTE: CHANGE OF DATE

8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., July 20 & 21
8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., July 22
Minnesota Department of Education
1500 Highway 36 West, Roseville

Safer Choices is an evidence-based curriculum taught over two consecutive years, 10 lessons in 9th grade (Level One) and 10 lessons in 10th grade (Level Two). Safer Choices involves teachers, parents, and community members to have a positive influence on adolescents' decisions regarding sex and help them feel supported in making healthy choices. In addition to the highly interactive training, each participant receives a copy of the Safer Choices curriculum, student workbooks and activity kit.

For more information and to register, see the flyer and registration form (PDF). Click here to register online. Registration scholarships are available. Questions? Contact Jill at 651-644-1447 x18, jill@moappp.org.

Coalition for Responsible Sex Ed Events

 Coalition for Responsible Sex Ed 

MOAPPP is a founding member of the Coalition for Responsible Sex Ed. The Coalition advocates for policies on sexuality education and access to confidential health care for minors. Here is a list of Coalition events for 2010. For additional information, visit www.coalitionforsexed.org.

No Coalition events in April.

Other Events

April 14, 2010
Depression and Anxiety in Teens

7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
Eisenhower Community Center, Room 233
1001 Hwy 7, Hopkins

Presenter: Norman T. Berlinger, MD, PhD Adolescent Psychotherapist and author of "Rescuing Your Teenager from Depression" will instruct participants on the typical and non-typical symptoms of depression and anxiety in young people in order to avoid missing the problems and take away strategies to intervene early. For parents of 13 to 25 year olds. Register online or call 952-988-4070.


April 14, 21 & 28
Evidence-Based Approaches & Programs: What You Need to Know to Compete for the Dough!

Join Healthy Teen Network for a series of three free webinars that will give you the knowledge, skills and resources you need to compete for teen reproductive health prevention funding.


Webinar #1: Wednesday, April 14, 2010
1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
Your Recipe for Success!: Using Evidence-Based Approaches in Teen Pregnancy, STI, and HIV Prevention

Whether your goal is to reduce the rate of teen pregnancy, STIs and/or HIV, during the first of three webinars you will learn what is meant by "evidence-based approaches" and about the evidence-based programs that will help you achieve your goals. Register here.


Webinar #2: Wednesday, April 21, 2010
1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
The Ingredients for Success!: Using an Evidence-Based or Innovative Program in Teen Pregnancy, STI, and HIV Prevention

During the second of three webinars you will learn what ingredients make an evidence-based or innovative program effective and examine some programs which may meet the unique needs of your teen population and organization. Register here.


Webinar #3: Wednesday, April 28, 2010
1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
Tailoring the Recipe for Greater Success!: Making Informed Adaptations to Evidence-Based Programs in Teen Pregnancy, STI, and HIV Prevention

Like some recipes, the ingredients of an evidence-based or innovative program may need to be modified or updated to make the program more effective for your teens. Common adaptations include: updating statistics, changing characters' names and responding to sexuality education policy. During the last of three webinars, you will learn which adaptations may or may not compromise the effectiveness of an evidence-based program and how to get support during the process. Register here.