April 2009



Announcements

A special invitation for those working with adolescent parents and their children...

We hope you will join us for MOAPPP's 18th Annual Conference—two days of dynamic speakers, challenging workshops and multiple opportunities to network with Minnesota professionals committed to teen pregnancy prevention and support for pregnant and parenting teens, including a teen parent program breakfast.

There are a number of sessions designed specifically for those working with adolescent parents and their children, as well as a variety of other workshops closely related to the work you do.

A sample of related conference workshops…

  • Moving from Pain to Power: Adolescent Parent Healing
    BraVada Garrett-Akinsonya, PhD, LP, Brakins Consulting and Psychological Services, Minneapolis
  • Solution Focused Practice for Adolescent Parents
    Richard R. Scott, RN, MPH, CPPA, Carver-Scott Educational Cooperative, Chaska
    Sue Schmidt, MA, New Beginnings, Chaska
  • Redefining Fatherhood in the New Millennium
    Clarence Jones, Q Health Services, Minneapolis
    Sam Simmons, Simmons Consulting, Minneapolis
  • Gaining Public Support for Young Families
    Brigid Riley, MPH, MOAPPP, St. Paul
  • There is a Reason they Act that Way: Understanding Adolescent Development
    Linda Bearinger, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Minnesota, Center for Adolescent Nursing, Minneapolis
  • Strengthening Families
    Joanne Mooney, MN Dept. of Human Services
    Mary Pat Sigurdson, Minneapolis Public Schools

For a complete list of speakers and workshops, please download the conference brochure on the MOAPPP website.

Please note: MOAPPP is committed to making this conference available to all professionals who wish to attend. Partial scholarships are available. For more information, please contact conference@moappp.org or 651-644-1447 x10.


Young Fathers Advisory Group Members Needed

MOAPPP is working with the support of the Minnesota Fathers & Families Network to form a Young Father's Advisory Group. This group will make recommendations for:

  • Identifying needs and gaps in services for young fathers in Minnesota
  • Needed policy changes with respect to young fathers
  • Increasing capacity of existing teen mothers programs to include fathers and of existing father programs to meet the unique needs of young males
  • Developing a means to provide information on best practices to those working with young fathers across the state

If you are interested in serving on this committee, please contact Sue Fust at 651-644-1447 x15 or sue@moappp.org.


Research

Adolescents' Ability to Read Different Emotional Faces Relates to their History of Maltreatment and Type of Psychopathology

A study of high risk adolescents (including autistic, anxious, high- and low-emotion 'conduct problem' teens, and those who have been maltreated) indicated that they show very specific strengths and deficits in their ability to recognize the emotions of others as indicated by their facial expressions. This may have implications for development of parenting abilities.


New Research Briefs from Child Trends

Three new research briefs have been issued by Child Trends exploring the recent increase in teen child-bearing, estimates for the future, and the importance of remaining focused on reducing the number of teens having babies.

  • Teen Births: Examining the Recent Increase (PDF), explores whether the data reflect a short-term blip or a true reversal in the decline of the U.S. teen birth rate. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy offers additional analysis of the data on their website.
  • Estimating Who Will Become Teen Mothers: Differences Across States
    An estimated 18% of females nationwide will become teen mothers. States vary widely in the estimated percentage of females who will have a baby before the age of 20, ranging from 8% in New Hampshire to 30% in Mississippi. It is estimated that 12% of females in Minnesota will become teen parents.
  • Ten Reasons to Still Keep the Focus on Teen Childbearing (PDF) highlights the need to continue the work that lead to a sharp drop in teen childbearing in the 1990s and early 2000s.


Resources

Reading to Toddlers: It's Not as Easy as it Sounds!

When you speak to teen parents about reading to their children, do they really know what you mean and how to do it? Watch a short video clip and some discussion questions that can be used to help young parents understand how you adapt reading to the needs of a squirmy toddler. Twenty-nine more vignettes on play interactions are available for purchase in DVD called Learning Happens from Zero to Three. If you can’t afford the video, or want to try out five more vignettes (including 1 in Spanish) for free before you buy, click here.



Navigating the Child Support System: Lessons from the Fathers at Work Initiative

Public/Private Ventures, 2009
Research shows that nearly half of all children born in the US today will be eligible for child support before they reach the age of 18. Many low-income, noncustodial fathers—who often struggle to make these payments—will seek services from workforce development organizations. Yet, understanding the child support enforcement system can be challenging—not only for noncustodial fathers but also for the workforce organizations that want to assist them. Navigating the Child Support System aims to help meet this challenge by providing information, resources and tools to use at the intersection of workforce development and child support enforcement.


Fatherhood Brochures on Sale

The National Fatherhood Initiative has brochures designed for fathers on sale for a short time. They include such titles as 10 Ways to Be a Better Dad (in English and Spanish), Staying Involved With Your Child While Incarcerated and others.


Policy Action Alert

Update on Home Visiting Amendment...

The home visiting amendment to Rep. Loeffler's DH bill, allowing counties and local public health to mutually agree to use the Home Visitor as the MFIP worker in certain populations (i.e. adolescent parents), passed in committee and is now being considered by the Health Care and Human Services Finance Committee. A pilot project in Ramsey County with home visiting public health nurses demonstrated that this plan is effective in helping teens attain educational objectives as well as other benefits, and that the need to occasionally impose sanctions on teens did not substantially damage the relationship between nurses and teen clients. Read the full report.


Upcoming MOAPPP Trainings

Thursday, April 30, 2009
What About the Baby? Nurturing Healthy Attachment in Young Families
(Co-sponsored by MOAPPP and MDH Family Home Visiting Program)

9:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud
$50 MOAPPP member/$85 non-member/$15 MDH contracted Family Home Visiting Program staff

Early learning happens in the context of relationships. This workshop focuses on the importance of relationships—between adolescent parents and their children and between young families and the professionals who work with them. It offers insight into the strengths and challenges faced by young parents, the competing developmental agendas of adolescent parents and their children, and strategies for promoting relationships that lead to the healthy development of both parent and child. For information or to register, contact Sue at 651-644-1447 x15 or sue@moappp.org.


Friday, June 19, 2009
What About the Baby? Nurturing Healthy Attachment in Young Families
(Co-sponsored by MOAPPP and MDH Family Home Visiting Program)

9:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
University Center Rochester, Rochester
$50 MOAPPP member/$85 non-member/$15 MDH contracted Family Home Visiting Program staff

Early learning happens in the context of relationships. This workshop focuses on the importance of relationships—between adolescent parents and their children and between young families and the professionals who work with them. It offers insight into the strengths and challenges faced by young parents, the competing developmental agendas of adolescent parents and their children, and strategies for promoting relationships that lead to the healthy development of both parent and child. For information or to register, contact Sue at 651-644-1447 x15 or or sue@moappp.org.


Upcoming Trainings

Monday, April 20, 2009
Building Cultural Competency with African-Born Youth, Young Adults and Families

9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Federal Hiway Credit Union Administration Building
840 Westminster Street, St. Paul

Most of us recognize the benefits of a diverse and equitable society. We also have a growing desire to be more culturally competent in dealing with the conflicts and challenges we face in achieving that goal. This training will integrate the skills of mediators, educators and direct service providers with the context of youth, young adults and families with African heritage living in Minnesota. It is offered with insight from a Muslim faith leader, a youth panel and conversations with others serving refugee/immigrant families. For more information, visit www.mnyipa.org.


Tuesday, April 21, 2009
From Dr. Seuss to Porn: Countering Normalization of Sexual Harm

12:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.
Schwan's Center at National Sports Center
1700 NE 105th Avenue, Blaine
$25

Living in a sexually toxic society means we're all affected and desensitized, to varying degrees, in both our personal and professional lives. To be effective, prevention requires recognition of these problems, as both a public health and public safety concern, as well as engaging others who care about children's and society's health. This session, presented by Cordelia Anderson, includes activities for discussion and action planning. Certificates of attendance are available. For more information contact, Donna McDonald, Violence Prevention Coordinator, Anoka County Community Health Department 763-422-7047, . Workshop sponsored by the Anoka County Child Abuse Prevention Council and Connexus Energy.


Summer Courses Offered at University of Minnesota Family Education

*CI5900-Sec 103 - Why Do Teens Act That Way? A Guide for Family Educators (1 credit)
Registration # 93522
Instructor: David Walsh
June 09, 2009 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
June 10, 2009 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

This course will describe the major features of adolescent brain development and explain how they influence the behavior of preteens and teens. Risk taking, impulsiveness, moodiness, problems with communication, changing sleep patterns and many other typical traits are all due to the changes taking place in the adolescent brain. In addition, this course will explore the needs of adolescents and strategies for parents and teachers to help teens survive and thrive during this dynamic developmental stage.

*CI5900-Sec 005 - Fatherhood (1 credit-online course)
Registration # 91814
Instructor: Chris Buzzetta
July 4, 2009 to Friday, August 7, 2009
Online Chat: Thursdays 7:00-7:45 p.m.

The course explores unique aspects of the father-child relationship and the important role fathers play in child development. Participants will explore attachment, topics of diversity and changing perspectives on masculinity and gender roles. They will also discover ways the father-child relationship can be fostered within educational settings. This class consists of 5 weekly modules. Each module starts on Saturday (Day 1) and continues through Friday (Day 7). Course schedule: Days 1-4: online discussion; Day 6 online chat; Day 7: weekly online reflection. Online chats will be held Thursday, July 9, 16, 23, 30, and August 6, from 7:00-7:45 PM Central time.

If you have any questions about registering for these courses, contact one-stop student services at 612-624-1111. If you would like to learn more about these courses, or other courses and programs offered in Family, Youth and Community, contact Heather Cline at or 612-624-1294.



For more resources and information about adolescent parents, visit the Adolescent Parent Program page on the MOAPPP website.